ESPN college basketball reporter tweets: Kobe Paras no longer joining UCLA

  • Promising basketball standout Kobe Paras will no longer join UCLA Bruins in NCAA Division I 
  • The information came from a press release that was tweeted by an ESPN college basketball reporter
  • Part of UCLA statement said Paras ‘has withdrawn from the university due to academic conditions of his admission not being met’

Basketball standout Kobe Paras will no longer join the UCLA Bruins in NCAA Division I basketball due to “academic conditions of his admission not being met.”

This was according to a line from a press release that was tweeted by an ESPN college basketball reporter named Jeff Borzello which he shared on his social media profile on June 29 (Thursday early morning, June 30, Manila time), an article written by Naveen Ganglani on Rappler stated.

Same news regarding Paras’ withdrawal from UCLA was likewise tweeted by two other basketball reporters–Sam Vecenie of CBS Sports and Rob Dauster of NBC Sports.

Paras, who is the son of former Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) MVP, was a former star cager for La Salle Green Hills in Philippine high school basketball.

He first confirmed his commitment to the Bruins in October 2014 and was also recruited by other NCAA Division I schools like Arizona State, California, Portland State, Texas-Arlington, UC Irvine, and UC Santa Barbara.

Meanwhile, other international sports websites likewise reported UCLA’s statement which reads:“Incoming freshman guard Kobe Paras, admitted upon condition to UCLA, has withdrawn from the university due to academic conditions of his admission not being met.

A promising incoming college freshman, the 6-foot-6 cager made waves as a promising high school player of Cathedral High School in LA.

His sheer athleticism, length and remarkable potential in the field of basketball earned him an offer at UCLA as he signed a National Letter of Intent to be part of the team last October 2015.

The young cager is yet to issue a statement regarding this.

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1 Comment

  1. Perhaps, we need to impose stricter measure and higher demand for ‘hard work’. We need to elevate the standards of scope and talent intensity training in line with the very stiff competition in the global arena.

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