With a one in 2 million chance, two separate fishermen caught two rare blue lobsters

  • Blaine Marsh and Scott MacKinnon both caught rare blue lobsters off the coast of Nova Scotia
  • Marsh’s caught his blue lobster near the Cape Breton fishing community of Alder Point
  • Mash revealed that after his granddaughter named the lobster “Blueberry’ it was popped safely back into the sea
  • MacKinnon’s lobster, which is named Opal, was caught in Low Point
  • MacKinnon said he plans to keep it in a tank then release it at the end of lobster season in July

NOVA SCOTIA, Canada – Proving the best of luck, two separate fishermen each caught an extremely rare blue lobster on their different boat trips off in one Canadian coast.

Kirstie McCrum mentioned in her article for Mirror CO UK published on May 25 that the blue lobster is indeed a lucky catch as  catching the blue lobster is a chance of one in two million.

Last weekend, Blaine Marsh and Scott MacKinnon both bagged the brightly-hued crustaceans off the coast of Nova Scotia.

Marsh’s caught his blue lobster near the Cape Breton fishing community of Alder Point as mentioned by Graham Slaughter in his article for CTV News.

“It’s a good luck sign for the fisherman,” said Mary Marsh, the fisherman’s mother

“I hope the fishermen have a good season this lobster season,” she added.

Mash revealed that after his granddaughter named the lobster “Blueberry“, it was popped safely back into the sea.

Meanwhile, MacKinnon’s lobster, which is named “Opal”, was caught in Low Point. The fisherman said he plans to keep it in a tank then release it at the end of the lobster season in July.

“The old people say it’s good luck and prosperity for the boat,” MacKinnon said.

“No chance on eating it, no. We’re going to send the good luck back to the ocean,” he added.

Marine experts explained that the uncommon blue pigmentation of lobsters is mainly caused by a genetic mutation involving a certain protein.

Although blue lobsters are considered very rare, the odds of one in two million is merely a “guess”, said Rob Bayer; the executive director of University of Maine Lobster Institute.

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